Alexander Anievas

Assistant Professor

Political Science


Ph.D., Cambridge

Dr. Alexander Anievas studies international relations, with a particular focus on the development of non-Eurocentric approaches to international historical sociology and political economy. Dr. Anievas has held fellowships at the University of Oxford and University of Cambridge. He is the author of Capital, the State, and War: Class Conflict and Geopolitics in the Thirty Years’ Crisis, 1914-1945 (University of Michigan Press, 2014), for which he was awarded the Sussex International Theory Book Prize, and co-author (with Kerem Nişancıoğlu) of How the West Came to Rule: The Geopolitical Origins of Capitalism (Pluto, 2015). He is currently working on a manuscript (with Richard Saull) entitled Legacies of Fascism: Race and the Far-Right in the Making of the Cold War.

Research Interests: History and Theory of International Relations; Historical Sociology; Marxism and Critical Theory; International Political Economy; Origins of the Two World Wars; Hegemony and World Order; War and Revolution; Origins of Capitalism and the ‘Rise of the West’; Race, Racism and the Far-Right in World Politics.

Editorial and Organizing Work: He is a member of the editorial collective Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory. He was a Managing Editor of the Cambridge Review of International Affairs between 2008 and 2010. In 2011, he organized the ‘Historical Materialism and International Relations’ seminar series held at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford (the podcasts can be found at: http://www.politics.ox.ac.uk/podcast-series/historical-materialism-and-international-relations-series-podcasts.html).

Websites

https://uconn.academia.edu/AlexanderAnievas

Publications

Authored Books

How the West Came to Rule: The Geopolitical Origins of Capitalism (London: Pluto, 2015) co-authored with Kerem Nişancioğlu.

International Political Sociology Best Book Prize of 2017, International Studies Association (ISA), Winner.

International Political Economy Working Group Book Prize of 2016, British International Studies Association, Winner.

Francesco Guicciardini Prize for Best Book in Historical International Relations of 2017, ISA, Honourable Mention.

ISA Theory Best Book Award of 2017, Finalist.

Susan Strange Book Prize of 2016, British International Studies Association (BISA), Finalist.

A symposium on the book can be found at: Progress in Political Economy (September 2016).

Capital, the State, and War: Class Conflict and Geopolitics in the Thirty Years’ Crisis, 1914-1945 (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, Configurations: Critical Studies of World Politics Series, 2014).

Winner of the 2015 Sussex International Theory Prize for best book in International Relations.

A symposium on the book can be found at: The Disorder of Things (January 2015).

Edited Books

Historical Sociology and World History: Uneven and Combined Development over the Longue Durée (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, Global Dialogues Series, 2016), co-edited with Kamran Matin.

Cataclysm 1914: The First World and the Making of Modern World Politics (Leiden, NL: Brill Press, Historical Materialism Series, 2015), editor.

Race and Racism in International Relations: Confronting the Global Colour Line (London: Routledge, Interventions Series, 2015), co-edited with Nivi Manchanda and Robbie Shilliam.

The Longue Durée of the Far-Right: An International Historical Sociology (London: Routledge, Routledge Studies in Modern History Series, 2015), co-edited with Richard Saull, Neil Davidson, and Adam Fabry.

Marxism and World Politics: Contesting Global Capitalism (London: Routledge, 2010), editor.

Articles

‘How Did the West Usurp the Rest? Origins of the Great Divergence over the Longue Durée’, with Kerem Nişancioğlu, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 59, No. 1 (January, 2017): forthcoming.

‘Confronting Eurocentrism, Reductionism and Reification in International Historical Sociology: A Reply’, International Politics, Vol. 53, No. 5 (October, 2016): forthcoming.

‘History, Theory and Contingency in the Study of International Relations: The Global Transformation Revisited’, International Theory, Vol. 8, No. 3 (November, 2016): 468-480.

‘Revolutions and International Relations: Rediscovering the Classical Bourgeois Revolutions’, European Journal of International Relations, Vol. 21, No. 4 (December, 2015): pp. 841-866.

‘International Relations between War and Revolution: Wilsonian Diplomacy and the Making of the Treaty of Versailles’, International Politics, Vol. 51, Vol. 5 (November, 2014): pp. 619-647.

The Poverty of Political Marxism’, with Kerem Nişancioğlu, International Socialist Review, Vol. 94, No. 4 (Fall, 2014): pp. 114-133.

‘1914 in World Historical Perspective: The “Uneven” and “Combined” Origins of the First World War’, European Journal of International Relations, Vol. 19, No. 4 (December, 2013): pp. 721-746.

‘What’s at Stake in the Transition Debate? Rethinking the Origins of Capitalism and the “Rise of the West”’, with Kerem Nişancioğlu, Millennium: Journal of International Studies, Vol. 42, No. 1 (September, 2013): pp. 78-102.

‘Back to “Normality”? US Foreign Policy under Obama’, with Adam Fabry and Robert Knox, International Socialism, Series 2, Vol. 136 (Autumn, 2012): pp. 3-28.

‘The International Political Economy of Appeasement: The Social Sources of British Foreign Policy during the 1930s’, Review of International Studies, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Winter, 2011): pp. 601-629.

‘The Uneven and Combined Development of the Meiji Restoration: A Passive Revolutionary Road to Capitalist Modernity’, with Jamie C. Allinson, Capital & Class, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Autumn, 2010): pp. 469-490.

‘The Uses and Misuses of Uneven and Combined Development: An Anatomy of a Concept’, with Jamie C. Allinson, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol. 22, No. 1 (March, 2009): pp. 47-67.

‘Theories of a Global State: A Critique’, Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory, Vol. 16, No. 2 (Spring, 2008): pp. 190-206.

‘Critical Dialogues: Habermasian Social Theory and International Relations’, Politics, Vol. 25, No. 3 (September, 2005): pp. 135-143.

Book Chapters

‘Troubling Time and Space in World Politics: Reimagining Western Modernity in the Atlantic Mirror’, with Kerem Nişancioğlu, in James Christie and Nesrin Degirmencioglu (eds.), Cultures of Uneven and Combined Development (Leiden, NL: Brill, 2016), forthcoming.

‘Historical Sociology, World History, and the Problematic of “the International”’, with Kamran Matin, in Alexander Anievas and Kamran Matin (eds.), Historical Sociology and World History: Uneven and Combined Development over the Longue Durée (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, Global Dialogues Series, 2016), pp. 1-16.

‘Rethinking Historical Sociology and World History: Beyond the Eurocentric Gaze’, with Kamran Matin, in in Alexander Anievas and Kamran Matin (eds.), Historical Sociology and World History: Uneven and Combined Development over the Longue Durée (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, Global Dialogues Series, 2016), pp. 251-255.

‘The First World War and the Making of Modern World Politics’, in Alexander Anievas (ed.) Cataclysm 1914: The First World War and the Making of Modern World Politics (Leiden, NL: Brill Press, 2015), pp. 1-20.

‘Marxist Theory and the Origins of the First World War’, in Alexander Anievas (ed.) Cataclysm 1914: The First World War and the Making of Modern World Politics (Leiden, NL: Brill Press, 2015), pp. 96-143.

‘Confronting the Global Colour Line: An Introduction’, with Nivi Manchanda and Robbie Shilliam, in Alexander Anievas, Nivi Manchanda, and Robbie Shilliam (eds.) Race and Racism in International Relations: Confronting the Global Colour Line (London: Routledge, 2015), pp. 1-15.

‘The Longue Durée of the Far-Right: An Introduction’, with Richard Saull, Neil Davidson, and Adam Fabry, in Richard Saull, Alexander Anievas, Neil Davidson, and Adam Fabry (eds.) The Longue Durée of the Far-Right: An International Historical Sociology (London: Routledge, 2015), pp. 1-20.

‘A World after Its Own Image? The State System, Capitalism and Unevenness’, in William Brown, Olaf Corry, and Agnes Czajka (eds.) International Relations: Continuity and Change in Global Politics, Volume I (Milton Keynes: Open University, 2014), pp. 129-172.

‘The Renaissance of Historical Materialism in International Relations Theory: An Introduction’, in Alexander Anievas (ed.) Marxism and World Politics: Contesting Global Capitalism (London: Routledge, 2010), pp. 1-10.

‘Approaching “the International”: Beyond Political Marxism’, with Jamie C. Allinson, in Alexander Anievas (ed.) Marxism and World Politics: Contesting Global Capitalism (London: Routledge, 2010), pp. 197-214.

‘On Habermas, Marx and the Critical Theory Tradition: Theoretical Mastery or Drift?’, in Cerwyn Moore and Chris Ferrands (eds.) International Relations and Philosophy: Interpretive Dialogues (London: Routledge, 2010), pp. 144-156.

Edited Sections and Online Articles

‘Interview with Alexander Anievas and Kerem Nişancioğlu on How the West Came to Rule’, Base (29 October 2016).

The Being and Becoming of Capitalism’, with Kerem Nişancioğlu, Progress in Political Economy blog (October 2016).

Provincialising European Capitalism’, with Kerem Nişancioğlu, Progress in Political Economy blog (September 2016).

How the West Came to Rule: An Interview with Alexander Anievas’, Counterpunch (May 27, 2016).

La théorie marxiste et les origines de la Première Guerre mondiale’, Période (February 2016): French translation of ‘Marxist Theory and the Origins of the First World War’, in Alexander Anievas (ed.), Cataclysm 1914: The First World War and the Making of Modern World Politics (Leiden, NL: Brill, 2015), pp. 96-143.

Pour une critique radicale de l’eurocentrisme: entretien avec Alexander Anievas et Kerem Nişancioğlu’, with Kerem Nişancioğlu, Période (November 2015).

English version: ‘Towards a Radical Critique of Eurocentrism: An Interview with Alexander Anievas and Kerem Nişancioğlu’, Viewpoint Magazine (December 2015).

Spanish version: ‘Para una critica radical del eurocentrismo. Entrevista’, Sinpermiso (February 2016).

Capitalism: A History of Violence’, with Kerem Nişancioğlu, The Disorder of Things (June 2015).

Rethinking the Geopolitics of Capitalist Modernity in the Era of the Two World Wars’, contribution to a symposium on Capital, the State, and War: Class Conflict and Geopolitics in the Thirty Years’ Crisis, 1914-1945, The Disorder of Things (January 2015).

Deciphering “the International” in Theory and History: A Reply to The Disorder of Things Forum’, contribution to a symposium on Capital, the State, and War: Class Conflict and Geopolitics in the Thirty Years’ Crisis, 1914-1945, The Disorder of Things (January 2015).

‘Reassessing the Nazi War Economy and the Origins of the Second World War: An Introduction to a Symposium on Adam Tooze’s The Wages of Destruction’, Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory, Vol. 22, No. 3/4 (Winter, 2014): pp. 281-297.

‘Confronting the Global Colour Line: Race, Space and Imperial Hierarchy’, with Nivi Manchanda, Special Issue for Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol. 26, No. 1 (March, 2013).

Libya, the Arab Revolution and Western Interventionism: A Case of Opposing Logics’, with Jamie C Allinson, New Left Project, 9 April 2011.

Three-part commissioned series on the ‘Political Economy of Contemporary Hungary’ for The Budapest Times, Vol. 8, Nos. 27-29 (July, 2010). German translation of first two pieces in the Budapester Zeitung, 14 and 19 July 2010.

‘Debating Uneven and Combined Development: Towards a Marxist Theory of “the International”?’, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol. 22, No. 1 (March, 2009), with author introduction.

‘Global Capitalism and the States System: Explaining Geopolitical Conflicts in Contemporary World Politics’, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol. 20, No. 4 (December, 2007), with author introduction.

‘Globalization, Imperialism and US Hegemony’, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol. 19, No. 2 (June, 2006), with author introduction.

Contact Information
Emailalexander.anievas@uconn.edu
Phone(860) 486-3002
Office LocationOak Hall 429
CampusStorrs
Office HoursWed 10:30am - 1:30pm
Linkhttps://uconn.academia.edu/AlexanderAnievas