Yonatan Morse

Assistant Professor

Political Science


Comparative Politics, African Studies

Ph.D. Georgetown University 

Dr. Yonatan Morse researches issues related to authoritarian institutions and electoral authoritarianism in the African context, where he has conducted extensive fieldwork. Previous to arriving at UConn he was Assistant Professor of Teaching in the Department of Government at Georgetown University, and the Associate Director of the Democracy and Governance Program. He has published articles in the journals World Politics, Democratization, Comparative Politics, and International Political Science Review. He is currently completing a book manuscript titled Electoral Authoritarianism in Africa: Parties, Patrons, and the Sources of Competition, and developing a new project that examines the origins of social protection in Africa. He has received grants from Georgetown University’s Center for Democracy and Civil Society, and was the recipient of Georgetown’s Glassman Award for Distinction in the Social Sciences. In addition, Dr. Morse has been a consultant and advisor for Freedom House, PITF, V-Dem, USAID, the State Department, the NDI, and is a contributor to the blog Democracy in Africa.

Select Publications:

Morse, Yonatan L. “Electoral Authoritarianism and Weak States in Africa: Parties vs. Presidents

in Tanzania and Cameroon” International Political Science Review (Forthcoming)

Morse, Yonatan L. “From Single-Parties to Electoral Authoritarian Regimes: Party Capacity and

the Sources of Electoral Hegemony and Competitiveness in Post-Cold War Africa”

Comparative Politics 48, no. 1 (October 2015): p.126-151

Morse, Yonatan L. “Party Matters: The Institutional Origins of Tanzania’s Competitive Hegemony”

Democratization 21, no.4 (2014): p.655-677

Morse, Yonatan L. “The Era of Electoral Authoritarianism” World Politics 64, no.1 (January

2012): p.161-198

Contact Information
Emailyonatan.morse@uconn.edu
Phone(203) 251-9508
CV Morse-Y-CV
Office LocationStamford 376 / Oak 420
CampusStamford / Storrs